Bringing effective condition monitoring and data management to industry

By T Lanterman (Mitsubishi Electric Europe BV Factory Automation) and D Wilson (Raima Inc)

 

Published in:

Electricity+Control, August 2014, pages 42 – 44

Enquiries: Email Thomas.lantermann@meg.mee.com or Nigel.rozier@raima.com

 

Download the full article on Bringing effective condition monitoring and data management to industry in PDF format.


We are experiencing the emergence of condition monitoring analysis packages that can infer parameters in difficult to monitor applications. Looking at two parameters that can be monitored, it is possible to infer the value of a third parameter, and take maintenance or production decisions based on that inference. We can expect mathematical models to improve, and associated software to become more adept at refining both condition monitoring data and event data, enabling better and more informed decisions.

As sensors and monitoring devices become ever smarter, the quality and amount of data available will increase, with whole new levels of data about status, production efficiency, energy consumption, machine availability, and more. The rise of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications is driving a new model of connected intelligence, coupling efficient communications with cost-effective data transfer costs. M2M communications makes data the ultimate management tool, enabling users to implement and operate vastly more sophisticated and complex systems while effectively monitoring what is happening within those systems.

The companies which the authors represent are at the forefront of this revolution in condition monitoring – not reacting to user demand, but driving developments in specific areas, giving end-users the tools they need to boost performance and reduce costs.

 

Take note

  • Condition monitoring analysis strategies are becoming more sophisticated.
  • Condition monitoring is vital on high value assets such as wind turbines.
  • Emerging condition monitoring techniques and technologies mean that condition monitoring can also provide cost-effective protection for smaller machines.